Wednesday, 24 Oct 2018

PHOTO ESSAY: Always Home, Always Away

Linda Grashoff

I have grown roots in two places: rural northern Ohio, and near-downtown Sarasota, Florida.

North and South, city and country, natural and built environments, those I reach by a contemplative walk, and those I reach by car ride: I try to catch the images that call out to me.

Raised by parents who believed that the material world does not exist, I disagreed early on. I photograph to affirm, honor, and praise what lies before me. Considering the material world sacred, I try to reveal my reverence for it in my work.

Wherever I am—depending on place, season, and weather—wind, sun, rain, or snow can change a scene in seconds. Bright sun enables some shots and disables those that only reveal themselves in more diffuse light. A photograph taken in the morning cannot be repeated in the afternoon, or even twenty minutes later. Every second has a reward, but recognizing the gift is not always easy.

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Here I have paired 14 photographs—one taken in Florida, one in Ohio—on the basis of similarities, sometimes of line or composition, sometimes of subject matter. Paired, the photographs speak of differences.

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Evidence of Leptothrix discophora, one of the iron bacteria, in Florida and Ohio.
Evidence of Leptothrix discophora, one of the iron bacteria, in Florida and Ohio.

 

 

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Sedge leaves along Ohio’s Vermilion River; Australian pine needles on Sarasota’s Lido Key.
Sedge leaves along Ohio’s Vermilion River; Australian pine needles on Sarasota’s Lido Key.

 

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Fog in Ohio and Florida.
Fog in Ohio and Florida.

 

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Field tiling, Ohio; restaurant doorway, Florida.
Field tiling, Ohio; restaurant doorway, Florida.

 

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A bayou in Cortez, Florida; the Back Pond in Schoepfle Garden, Birmingham, Ohio.
A bayou in Cortez, Florida; the Back Pond in Schoepfle Garden, Birmingham, Ohio.

 

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Sarasota sun; Oberlin fog.
Sarasota sun; Oberlin fog.

 

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Sand and snow.
Sand and snow.

 

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More photographs showing evidence of the iron bacteria are in Grashoff’s recently published book, They Breath Iron: Artistic and Scientific Encounters with an Ancient Life Form. The book describes microbes that create colorful films and deposits in and along Ohio’s Vermilion River and elsewhere around the world. For information about They Breathe Iron, please e-mail linda@lindagrashoff.com. See other photographs at lindagrashoff.wordpress.com. 

 

 

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